Sunday, September 2, 2018

Faith-Based Anti-Gun Coalition Formed to Take Down a Gun Manufacturer...From The Inside Out

Faith-Based Anti-Gun Coalition Formed to Take Down a Gun Manufacturer...From The Inside Out

Faith-Based Anti-Gun Coalition Formed to Take Down a Gun Manufacturer...From The Inside Out
A group of 11 Catholic groups came together to purchase stock in Smith & Wesson. The group purchased 200 shares, the minimum number required to for shareholders to demand reports from the company. Now, they want the gun manufacturer to provide a report that details what the company is doing to promote "gun safety measures" and "produce safer gun and gun products."
According to an SEC filing, which is submitted to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), here's what the group wants to see from Smith & Wesson:
Shareholders request the Board of Directors issue a report by February 8, 2019, at reasonable expense and excluding proprietary information, on the company’s activities related to gun safety measures and the mitigation of harm associated with gun products, including the following (emphasis mine):
Shareholders request the Board of Directors issue a report by February 8, 2019, at reasonable expense and excluding proprietary information, on the company’s activities related to gun safety measures and the mitigation of harm associated with gun products, including the following:
• Evidence of monitoring of violent events associated with products produced by the company.
• Efforts underway to research and produce safer guns and gun products.
• Assessment of the corporate reputational and financial risks related to gun violence in the U.S.

The resolution asks American Outdoor Brands Company (AOBC) to report on activities underway to mitigate the risks that its products may be misused in criminal acts of gun violence. Contrary to what the company suggests, AOBC has both the responsibility and capacity to play a more active role in how its products are used; the requested assessment and reporting are the first steps towards acceptance of this responsibility.  As a result of several high profile mass shootings in the past year, most recently the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, FL, gun violence is increasingly being seen as a public health crisis with extraordinary human and financial costs.
Importantly, events of gun violence have led to mounting public backlash against gun makers and retailers including calls for boycotts, divestment and demands for gun safety regulation at both the federal and state levels. This environment presents serious business risks which demand a meaningful response from AOBC. The UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights make clear the corporate responsibility to seek to prevent or mitigate adverse human rights impacts that are directly linked to their operations, products or services by their business relationships, even if they have not contributed to those impacts.
AOBC has a responsibility to mitigate potential impacts through improved monitoring of its distribution and retail sales channels and enhanced reporting on research and development efforts to improve the safety features of its consumer products. The resolution does not request that AOBC produce smart guns or other specific products; nor does it call for the company to endorse a gun control regulatory or policy agenda. The resolution does, however, ask for reporting because existing disclosures of current risk mitigation measures are seen as insufficient for investors to assess their effectiveness.
The argument in favor of the proxy ballot vote:
Given recent events of gun violence, weapons manufacturers are facing an extraordinary climate of heightened and sustained scrutiny which may negatively impact their businesses if they do not take more meaningful efforts to mitigate risks.
James Debney, the President and CEO of American Outdoor Brands Corporation, the parent company of Smith & Wesson, the entire saga is a political ploy.

“Unlike a bonafide investor, this proponent purchased just 200 shares, the bare minimum needed under SEC rules to place an item on the proxy with the sole objective to push an anti-firearms agenda, designed to harm our company, disrupt the local sale of our products and destroy stockholder value,” Debney said Thursday during a conference call with investors, Guns.com reported. “This proponent will gladly sacrifice its investments and yours to achieve its political objectives.”
 
 
During his call, Debney said this report does absolutely nothing to improve community safety. He believes this is just a move by gun control advocates.

"We find it curious that the proponents of this proposal overlook our long-standing call for and involvement in actions that truly have meaningful impacts, such as greater vigilance in enforcing the laws and criminal penalties on the books, and the need to meaningfully address the role that mental illness plays in senseless violence,” he said. “In contrast, the proponents’ efforts appear to be more about their anti-gun agenda.”

Sturm, Ruger and Company went through a similar situation back in May where they were forced to prepare a similar report.
The coalition who purchased stocks in Smith & Wesson include:
• Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary, U.S.-Ontario Province
• Adrian Dominican Sisters
• Catholic Health Initiatives
• Congregation of St. Joseph
• Daughters of Charity, Province of St Louise
• Mercy Health
• Mercy Investment Services
• Sisters of Bon Secours, USA
• Sisters of Providence, Mother Joseph Province
• Sisters of St. Francis of Philadelphia
• Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet - St. Louis Province

 

Saturday, July 7, 2018

Catholic Priest Michael Pfleger and Thousands shut down Chicago highway with gun control march

Thousands of Chicago protesters shut down a major highway on Saturday to oppose gun violence and call for stronger gun laws.

After an hour-long standstill, police announced they were shutting down all northbound lanes of the Dan Ryan Expressway to allow protesters to march on the road.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel and the city’s police superintendent had voiced support for the protest, which was led by the Rev Michael Pfleger, the charismatic Catholic priest heading a largely African American church in one of the South Side neighborhoods hard-hit by gang violence.

Illinois state police have jurisdiction over the interstate, and had threatened to arrest anyone who stepped on to the entry ramp.

But protesters were allowed on to several lanes of highway on Saturday as corrections department buses waited alongside. Protestors chanted “shut it down.”

Pfleger, the Rev Jesse Jackson and Chicago police Superintendent Eddie Johnson were walking side-by-side among them.


 After long negotiations between police and march leaders, the protest was eventually allowed to take over the whole highway northbound and proceed.

Daniel Blalock, 35, said had been willing to get arrested if necessary: “I didn’t come here planning to go home. I want peace, just peace. It’s going to take a long time but this is the first step.”
Shortly before the march began, Illinois’s governor, Bruce Rauner, said that Pfleger and other organizers had agreed to limit their demonstration to the highway shoulder, without taking over the road. In a tweet, Pfleger called the assertion a “LIE” and said the protest would go on as planned.
Later in the day, Rauner called the shutdown “unacceptable.” The Republican said in a tweet Saturday that he was “disappointed” in Emanuel, and called on him to “take swift and decisive action to put an end to this kind of chaos.”

Emanuel responded in a tweet : “It was a peaceful protest. Delete your account.”

Protesters said they hoped the march would push public officials to pass stronger gun control laws and address the underlying causes of gun violence in Chicago.

“If Governor Rauner and Mayor Rahm Emanuel can meet in secret to decide to give Amazon a billion dollars,” referring to officials’ attempts to lure the company to Chicago, “they can meet and decide to do something about not only gun violence but inequality,” said attorney Eric Martin White, 50, carrying an American flag.
I’m hoping that this is just a little spark that encourages people to continue to lift their voices and demand a redress of grievances,” he said.  Katherine Pisabaj, 19, wore a black halter top to the march to show the scar running down her stomach, where doctors operated after she was shot in the back on 25 February in the city’s Logan Square neighborhood, a hipster enclave that also sees gang violence. 



Her mother, Yolanda Segura, held a sign calling on President Trump to help Chicago. Pisabaj’s four young nephews joined them, sitting on the hot concrete of the highway as protesters waited for news of the lane closures. “This can’t be a shared experience any more, I don’t want my nephews to have to go through what I went through,” she said. “Now that young people are speaking up and getting involved, we have a lot more power. I don’t think this will be an issue my whole life, we’re going to make a change.”  Pisabaj, a college student planning to study nutrition science, said police found that a gang member had shot her in a case of mistaken identity. “It can happen to anyone of any age anywhere,” said Segura. “We need stronger laws on guns.”  Pfleger and his parishioners are calling for “commonsense” gun laws and for city and state officials to meet with them to talk about what they see as the root causes of the city’s notorious gun violence: poverty, lack of jobs, subpar or shuttered schools for largely African American residents on the city’s South and West sides.   Last year more than 3,000 people were shot in Chicago, more than 600 of them fatally.

Thursday, June 21, 2018

Ohio’s GOP legislators nix a 'sensible' gun-control law

They rejected the treasonous conspiracy against the 2nd amendment by a "broad coalition of students, teachers, school counselors, police chiefs, pediatricians and Catholic clergy demanding" gun control...

Source: http://www.vindy.com/news/2018/jun/21/ohios-gop-legislators-nix-a-sensible-gun/
Republican leaders in the Ohio House and Senate have largely ignored Republican Gov. John Kasich’s appeal for expedited action on his proposal to update the state’s gun laws.
But they will be hard-pressed to turn a deaf ear to a broad coalition of students, teachers, school counselors, police chiefs, pediatricians and Catholic clergy demanding a vote on the governor’s packages of reform.

Indeed, in a joint letter sent last week to state legislative leaders, the groups representing the police chiefs and others criticized the Ohio General Assembly’s seeming “lack of urgency” in updating Ohio’s gun laws.

There are companion bills in the House and Senate containing changes recommended by a bipartisan advisory panel convened by Kasich. The measures have been stalled since mid-April.
Two months ago, we suggested that Republican majorities in Congress and in the Ohio Legislature are dragging their feet on enacting sensible gun-control legislation because they fear the politically powerful National Rifle Association.

It is noteworthy that Republican President Donald J, Trump and Republican Gov. Kasich are pushing for changes to existing guns laws, but are unable to get GOP lawmakers to act.
In early March, Trump met with members of Congress from both parties and made it clear he would take on the NRA to get national gun-control legislation enacted.

Gov. Kasich, recognizing that this is an issue that crosses political lines, formed a bipartisan gun-policy advisory group after a sniper killed 58 people attending an open-air country music concert in Las Vegas.

Kasich is urging state lawmakers to adopt a package of reforms that would: take guns away from people at risk of hurting themselves or others; keep guns away from those convicted of domestic violence; facilitate gun-violence protection orders; close some gaps in the background check system; strengthen the law against “straw man” gun purchases; and ban bump stocks and armor-piercing ammunition.

Kasich’s reassurance

As we noted in the April editorial, the governor sought to reassure pro-gun advocates that the changes he was proposing to Ohio’s laws were limited in their scope.

“No one is interested in some slippery slope in trying to go and grab everyone’s guns,” Kasich said.
The bump-stocks prohibition is similar to the one President Trump has proposed.

But there’s a measure moving through the Ohio General Assembly that Kasich says he will not sign. The so-called “Stand Your Ground” bill, which has the support of pro-gun groups, would remove the requirement to try and retreat before taking lethal action.

The Ohio Prosecuting Attorneys Association is opposed to the bill, saying it would make it harder to convict criminals.

The very fact that Republicans lawmakers consider this more important than the sensible, much-needed measure sought by the governor speaks volumes about their legislative priorities.
It’s time they received a reality check.

Here’s what the letter from the coalition urging legislative action on Kasich’s package of reforms said, in part:

“Within this past month alone, Americans have grieved for those killed or injured in three school massacres and our nation continues to average more than one shooting at a school per week. This issue is not going away and we cannot continue to bury our heads in the sand and pretend that this violence won’t happen here – because it has. And it will again.”

There was a meeting Tuesday of House Republicans to judge the level of interest in moving forward with House Bill 585.

The legislation also would require that gun purchases be entered into the statewide law-enforcement database, something the governor has urged local agencies to do.

Before Tuesday’s GOP caucus, the measure, sponsored by Rep. Mike Henne of Clayton, had no co-sponsors and was languishing in committee.

Not much has changed today, which means the chances of passage are slim at best.
Here’s what House Speaker Ryan Smith of Bidwell had to say about the Kasich measure:
“That bill has frankly caused a lot of consternation with our caucus. It’s not to say that we’re insensitive to it or don’t want to do something on it, it’s just people are very protective of the Second Amendment.”

Such justification for inaction is a cop-out because there’s nothing Kasich has proposed that’s an assault on the Second Amendment.

Tuesday, June 5, 2018

CCRKBA Rips Hypocrisy Of Anti-Gun Chicago Priest

Wednesday, May 9, 2018

Pope calls for banning "all weapons"... YES HE DID.

Yes He did call for the banning of all weapons. Snopes and the other propaganda rags trying to help cover it up are liars. Total abolishment of private gun ownership is the official doctrine of the Catholic cult!

But look at all the guns on the Vatican's compound




Sturm Ruger Shareholders Adopt Measure Backed by Gun Control Activists

Sturm Ruger Shareholders Adopt Measure Backed by Gun Control Activists

Image
A Sturm Ruger display at a gun show. The firearms manufacturer will face proposals from gun-control activists at its annual shareholders meeting on Wednesday.CreditDaniel Acker/Bloomberg
Sturm Ruger, one of the country’s largest firearms makers, had urged shareholders for weeks to reject a proposal from a group of Roman Catholic nuns demanding more transparency from the company on whether it planned to develop safer products and monitor the ones already in circulation.

But when the votes were counted at the company’s annual meeting on Wednesday, a majority of investors sided with the nuns.

Ruger, which makes a variety of weapons, including a style of rifle often used in mass shootings, must now produce a report by February on how it tracks violence associated with its firearms, what kind of research it is conducting related to so-called smart gun technology and its assessment of the risks that gun-related crimes pose to the company’s reputation and finances.

The vote was a rebuke to the company’s leaders and victory for guncontrol activists who had prepared the resolution. But the chief executive, Christopher J. Killoy, played down the impact of the measure’s passage

“This proposal requires Ruger to prepare a report,” Mr. Killoy told shareholders after the vote was announced. “That’s it, a report. It cannot force us to change our business, which is lawful and constitutionally protected.”

The Ruger meeting was the first chance for activist shareholders to confront a publicly held American gun maker since 17 people died in Parkland, Fla., in a school shooting in February.

Shareholder approval of the proposal faced long odds, but activists had prepared for months to challenge Ruger. They plan to raise similar issues at other shareholder meetings this year.
Ruger did not support the proposal, which was submitted by 11 members of the Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility, a shareholder advocacy organization that included health care networks and several groups of nuns. The company said in a public filing that “the intentional criminal misuse of firearms is beyond our control.”

But Institutional Shareholder Services, an advisory firm, backed the proposal, describing it as a push for “concrete evidence that the board is properly assessing risks to the company’s long-term viability.”

On a separate front, Amalgamated Bank, an institutional investor and retail bank that promotes social justice issues, had worked with other groups that have tried to convince major Ruger shareholders like BlackRock and Vanguard that the company’s close ties to the National Rifle Association had exposed it to risk.

Amalgamated said on Tuesday that it would withhold its vote to reappoint Sandra Froman, the only woman on the Ruger board, to the seat she has held since 2015.

Ms. Froman won re-election on Wednesday.

Ms. Froman, a lawyer, has served on the N.R.A.’s board since 1992 and was its president from 2005 to 2007. She helped organize a breakfast at the N.R.A.’s annual meeting in Dallas this month, where President Trump and Vice President Mike Pence spoke.

In a letter sent to Ruger last month, Amalgamated’s chief executive, Keith Mestrich, said Ms. Froman’s connections to the gun group “may inhibit objective assessment and management of the risks” that Ruger faced.

Ruger has contracted with the N.R.A. for some of its promotional and advertising activities and has made over $9 million in payments to the group over the last two years, according to public filings.
Ms. Froman did not respond to requests for comment.

Ruger is based in Southport, Conn., but held its shareholder meeting at a hotel a short drive from one of its factories in Arizona.

Ruger has faced previous pressure to open up. In 2016, New York’s public advocate asked the Securities and Exchange Commission to look into allegations that Ruger had misled investors and failed to properly disclose its reputational and liability risks.

“This is not the first time this has happened, though there’s a little more intensity now,” said Brian G. Rafn, a principal at Morgan Dempsey Capital Management, referring to calls for changes in the gun industry. “This is a very, very polarized time, with everyone lining up on either side of the fence.”
Follow Tiffany Hsu on Twitter: @tiffkhsu.

Tuesday, May 1, 2018

The Catholic Church on gun control and gun rights: 13abc talks with Bishop Thomas

Video: http://www.13abc.com/content/news/--481305921.html

TOLEDO, Ohio (WTVG) - Abortion, gay marriage, immigration rights are divisive and debatable issues, but in the eyes of the Roman Catholic church those are issues where there is little if any room for debate.

 
 
In an interview with Toledo Bishop Daniel Thomas, we get a closer look at the church's position on what is perhaps the most hot button issue in our country right now, gun control.
Bishop Thomas addresses questions over assault weapons, the second amendment and arming teachers more.