Tuesday, June 5, 2018

CCRKBA Rips Hypocrisy Of Anti-Gun Chicago Priest

Wednesday, May 9, 2018

Pope calls for banning "all weapons"...




But look at all the guns on the Vatican's compound





Sturm Ruger Shareholders Adopt Measure Backed by Gun Control Activists

Sturm Ruger Shareholders Adopt Measure Backed by Gun Control Activists

Image
A Sturm Ruger display at a gun show. The firearms manufacturer will face proposals from gun-control activists at its annual shareholders meeting on Wednesday.CreditDaniel Acker/Bloomberg
Sturm Ruger, one of the country’s largest firearms makers, had urged shareholders for weeks to reject a proposal from a group of Roman Catholic nuns demanding more transparency from the company on whether it planned to develop safer products and monitor the ones already in circulation.

But when the votes were counted at the company’s annual meeting on Wednesday, a majority of investors sided with the nuns.

Ruger, which makes a variety of weapons, including a style of rifle often used in mass shootings, must now produce a report by February on how it tracks violence associated with its firearms, what kind of research it is conducting related to so-called smart gun technology and its assessment of the risks that gun-related crimes pose to the company’s reputation and finances.

The vote was a rebuke to the company’s leaders and victory for guncontrol activists who had prepared the resolution. But the chief executive, Christopher J. Killoy, played down the impact of the measure’s passage

“This proposal requires Ruger to prepare a report,” Mr. Killoy told shareholders after the vote was announced. “That’s it, a report. It cannot force us to change our business, which is lawful and constitutionally protected.”

The Ruger meeting was the first chance for activist shareholders to confront a publicly held American gun maker since 17 people died in Parkland, Fla., in a school shooting in February.

Shareholder approval of the proposal faced long odds, but activists had prepared for months to challenge Ruger. They plan to raise similar issues at other shareholder meetings this year.
Ruger did not support the proposal, which was submitted by 11 members of the Interfaith Center on Corporate Responsibility, a shareholder advocacy organization that included health care networks and several groups of nuns. The company said in a public filing that “the intentional criminal misuse of firearms is beyond our control.”

But Institutional Shareholder Services, an advisory firm, backed the proposal, describing it as a push for “concrete evidence that the board is properly assessing risks to the company’s long-term viability.”

On a separate front, Amalgamated Bank, an institutional investor and retail bank that promotes social justice issues, had worked with other groups that have tried to convince major Ruger shareholders like BlackRock and Vanguard that the company’s close ties to the National Rifle Association had exposed it to risk.

Amalgamated said on Tuesday that it would withhold its vote to reappoint Sandra Froman, the only woman on the Ruger board, to the seat she has held since 2015.

Ms. Froman won re-election on Wednesday.

Ms. Froman, a lawyer, has served on the N.R.A.’s board since 1992 and was its president from 2005 to 2007. She helped organize a breakfast at the N.R.A.’s annual meeting in Dallas this month, where President Trump and Vice President Mike Pence spoke.

In a letter sent to Ruger last month, Amalgamated’s chief executive, Keith Mestrich, said Ms. Froman’s connections to the gun group “may inhibit objective assessment and management of the risks” that Ruger faced.

Ruger has contracted with the N.R.A. for some of its promotional and advertising activities and has made over $9 million in payments to the group over the last two years, according to public filings.
Ms. Froman did not respond to requests for comment.

Ruger is based in Southport, Conn., but held its shareholder meeting at a hotel a short drive from one of its factories in Arizona.

Ruger has faced previous pressure to open up. In 2016, New York’s public advocate asked the Securities and Exchange Commission to look into allegations that Ruger had misled investors and failed to properly disclose its reputational and liability risks.

“This is not the first time this has happened, though there’s a little more intensity now,” said Brian G. Rafn, a principal at Morgan Dempsey Capital Management, referring to calls for changes in the gun industry. “This is a very, very polarized time, with everyone lining up on either side of the fence.”
Follow Tiffany Hsu on Twitter: @tiffkhsu.

Tuesday, May 1, 2018

The Catholic Church on gun control and gun rights: 13abc talks with Bishop Thomas

Video: http://www.13abc.com/content/news/--481305921.html

TOLEDO, Ohio (WTVG) - Abortion, gay marriage, immigration rights are divisive and debatable issues, but in the eyes of the Roman Catholic church those are issues where there is little if any room for debate.

 
 
In an interview with Toledo Bishop Daniel Thomas, we get a closer look at the church's position on what is perhaps the most hot button issue in our country right now, gun control.
Bishop Thomas addresses questions over assault weapons, the second amendment and arming teachers more.

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

Francis-appointed cardinals march for immigration, gun control on Good Friday

April 3, 2018 (LifeSiteNews) – On Good Friday, two Pope Francis-appointed cardinals participated in processions that focused on immigration and gun control.

Cardinal Joseph Tobin of Newark, New Jersey joined a walk “for justice, for immigrants, and for all.” Chicago’s Cardinal Blase Cupich participated in a “peace walk” and praised anti-gun teenagers for giving “all of us a lesson in courage.” 


Read More

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Bishops take to Twitter to back 'March for Our Lives'

Bishops take to Twitter to back ‘March for Our Lives’
In this March 14, 2018, file photo, Abbey Kadlec, left, and her classmates stand on the stairs and sidewalk of Lewis and Clark High School to protest gun violence, part of a nationwide movement, in Spokane, Wash. (Credit: Jesse Tinsley/The Spokesman-Review via AP.)
NEW YORK - As thousands marched on Washington and around the country in support of tighter gun control policies, a number of Catholic bishops took to social media to offer support for those participating in the events.

At a Mass for Peace, Justice, and Healing in Boston, Cardinal Sean O’Malley praised the young people of Parkland, Florida - the most recent school massacre, where 17 students and teachers were killed in February, and which set off a new wave of public activism in protest of gun violence. There was a school shooting in Maryland last week as well.

“The extraordinary role of the students from Parkland in focusing the country on this critical social problem should be a sign of hope for all of us. The manner by which the students have presented their case has already impacted the tone of the debate about guns and violence,” said O’Malley.

“They have helped us to realize that these tragedies victimize people from all walks of life, from every class and ethnicity. We owe these students and those who will join them today our support and our gratitude,” he said.

O’Malley acknowledged that the Second Amendment of the U.S. Constitution affirms the right for citizens to bear arms, but added that all rights are subject to regulation.

Throughout the day on Saturday, he took to Twitter to offer commentary on gun violence and used the official hash tag for the event, #MarchforOurLives.

Meanwhile, Bishop Thomas Tobin of Providence, Rhode Island - who is a new adaptor to Twitter, having only joined last month - posted the following message: “It seems to me that private citizens shouldn’t be permitted to own assault rifles any more than then they can own chemical weapons of mass destruction. How about a little common sense in this public debate?”

Tobin identifies on his Twitter bio as “ardently pro-life,” and in 2013 publicly announced he had switched his party affiliation from the Democratic party to join the Republicans over the issue of abortion.

In San Antonio, Texas, Archbishop Gustavo Garcia-Siller also weighed in on the March for Our Lives events, writing on Twitter: “What is a common factor in all those horrible killings in our country? Guns, bombs, arms. Let’s listen to the wisdom of our young people in Washington, Florida, throughout the US. Let’s listen to those affected directly by these crimes. We’ve not been able to solve it. Let’s listen!”

Garcia-Siller has frequently used Twitter to call for greater action on guns, especially following the shooting at a Texas church in Sutherland Springs in November 2017, which left 26 people dead and 20 others injured.

Cardinal Blase Cupich - who recently started his own initiative to end gun violence in Chicago - met with high school students from his archdiocese who were traveling to Washington on Friday to participate in the March on Saturday to offer a special blessing. He also posted on Twitter on Saturday that “I want to assure all our young people that “I am with you” and all those marching in Chicago and around the nation today to #EndGunViolence.”

RELATED: Students join March for Our Lives against gun violence, in racial solidarity

Meanwhile, Bishop Bill Wack of the diocese of Pensacola-Tallahassee, and one of the nation’s youngest Catholic bishops, applauded the young people marching against gun violence, drawing a comparison to the annual March for Life against abortion.

“It’s good to see so many young people raising their voices against gun violence, just as it is inspiring to see them at the March For Life every year. We must be pro-life in all of life’s beautiful forms and stages. God, give us the gift of peace,” he wrote on Twitter.

Earlier this month, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) called on Congress to work together to find “concrete proposals” in response to the “crisis of gun violence.”
“We must explore ways to curb violent images and experiences with which we inundate our youth, and ensure that law enforcement have the necessary tools and incentives to identify troubled individuals and get them help,” they wrote.

The U.S. bishops have long advocated for a comprehensive approach to reducing gun violence that addresses mental illness without stigmatization, which they reiterated in their most recent statement.
They concluded their appeal by noting that in light of the Parkland massacre, it was time for action, instead of mere talk.

“In the words of St. John, ‘let us love not in word or speech but in deed and truth,’” they wrote.

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Sunday, March 25, 2018

A day after March for Our Lives, Pope urges youth to speak out

Pope Francis blesses attendees and palm leaves during at St Peter's square on March 25, 2018

"Dear young people, you have it in you to shout," the Pope said in his Palm Sunday address at St. Peter's Square in Rome.
Pope Francis at the the end of Palm Sunday Mass in Vatican City

Palm Sunday -- celebrated on the Sunday before Easter -- is commemorated by Christians as the day Jesus entered Jerusalem in the week of his crucifixion, when palm leaves were strewn in his path. Noting that this Palm Sunday coincides with World Youth Day, the pontiff used the opportunity to compare youth to Jesus's followers, who were scorned by his detractors.

"It is up to you not to keep quiet," Pope Francis said. "Even if others keep quiet, if we older people and leaders -- so often corrupt -- keep quiet, if the whole world keeps quiet and loses its joy, I ask you: Will you cry out?"

A day earlier, survivors of the shooting massacre at a Parkland, Florida high school led protests around the country and even abroad in favor of stricter gun control laws.
That followed the National School Walkout in mid-March, when thousands of students protesting gun violence left their classrooms for 17 minutes -- one for each of the 17 people killed at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School on Valentine's Day.
In a message prepared in advance of World Youth Day, the Pope told young people: "Do not be afraid to face your fears honestly, to recognize them for what they are and to come to terms with them."